Play Bold: The Best of Season 2

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Episode 2 is now at the end, and we summarize the best moments from all our fantastic guests sharing their wisdom in this last episode. It has been a privilege to have you all. I really enjoyed all the deep dives into the DNA of innovation, growth, and sustainability, as well as adjacent areas, link to this. The Play Bold philosophy is "Your aim will be not to perpetuate your existing business model but to buy time — time to build up the capabilities and resources you need to make the leap to the next S-curve intelligently" and you all contributed to putting this into color and paint pictures to be shared for coming years. 

Magwis penkers newbook play bold how towin the business game through crative destruction is available to buy now onAmazon Com, read the book and, in the meantime, sit back and enjoyed theplaybold podcast, so welcome to macniss painkers playBotl podcast and the best bits of season to these can all be enjoyedwhile scrolling, through the pages of Magnusis newbook available on Amazonplaybold how to win the business game through creative destruction. Now it'shard to believe that Magnus has spoken to another swelve, fantastic guests inthis latest season of playbold, some truly interesting conversations withinspirational people who have all been more than happy to share their thoughtsand wisdom. All the episodes are now available to listen to in ful fromwherever you download your podcast and, of course, that book is still availableon Amazon for you to buyte and read now with magnas handing the reins over tome for this best of season to episode, let's recaunt the interviews that youcan hear in full episode. One saw magnus inviting Jo Han Rauss of Lego,serious, playfame and now heading up halts with campuses across Tou by theUnited Kingdom and America, the Higher Education Company. It was a chat aboutso many fascinating things, including working to term the pandemic situation,to an advantage, among many things that magnus asked he got Johan to talk abouttheir thinking on higher education online. You could say that it prettysoon became obvious that this pademic would change a lot in our industry, and I would say everybody realized that this wouldprofale what was previously sort of expermental and partly you know, lookdown upon online education and it will propel that into the to the forefrontof higher education and much faster than I believe many people anticipated.So so we decided to develop some new courses and versions of existingprograms and a new program based on this sort of limid less learning approach.But we also did something else. We wanted to go beyond the traditional wayof thinking of education and arm really in the spirit of lifelongly learningand there we had some early discussions with the major corporation in the world,namely Arnston Joung, and I can say this because it's public now, but we'veactually at the same time as this pandemic was, you know, causing a lotof problems for everybody. We announced a partnership with Oursteya to actuallyhave Protentiani. Hundreds of thousands oftheir staff continue their education inside arsting on, and we would sort oftake on that and sure that thet has the right, quality and so forth and thenbring people onto a new program which we call a technology or ATTECH MBA,which is ugly but very pioneering. An interesting for for high education istruly going where I believe it's going, namely small stackable elements likeLego, ricks and throughout your career INNOCENC. So you can be able to stackthis and build certain degrees after a while. So I believe at that's somethingwe did. We also have some interesting conversation with a US, Ivy Leagu Col,to do some really cool stuff. In episode too, it was Daniel, nonths,Tago ver. The found himself being questioned by Magnus and Daniel withhis IMBRAREX bankground, gave some really interesting insights into how hefound himself well, both the fan of Star Wars and a man who has head ofimbrerix at the cuttingage of technology and using that technology tokeep innovation flowing at the needed pace. We also heard Daniel talkingabout being influenced by a higher...

...purpose and the importance of that Heiswhat he had to say. You know the younger generations. They are very, very good at at you know, pasingsuch questions to us to do the executives more and more. We perceivethat the real competition in the market is for talents, and we perceive thattalented people they don't want to serve. You know the simple interest of the shareholders of thecompany. They want to be part of something that is larger, that isbigger that is capable to create a legacy. If you will, or at least acontribution, they can feel proud of beauty, and this has been a very strongsentiment in the history of embrore. If you were to ask me why I think embrooisstill alive, as I mentioned before, of course, there are many. You knowbusiness related ar technical related explanations I could offer, but what Imyself truly believe it is a sentiment. It is a feeling that was there from thestart, because the task was so hard. You know to establish a High TechCompany to compete, gooblly out of a country that has so many challengeslike Brazi that felt, like you know, climbing the highest mountaing yen thatwas inspiring. It was an inspiry mission, it inspired our founders,inspired our pioneers pioneers and it keeps inspiring us to this day. Butagain as we have to move forward, we started to realize. Even this, you know,Kime in the High Mountain is, is not enough as an inspiration for thecurrent generation and thank God. This is happening because I'm really excited to see how sustainability isbecoming. You know the top one item in t the future generations agender. Weneed to make sure who you know serve our purpose and servour market servourcustomers without creating a problem for our. You know children an ourgrandsens to have to sove it its pretty much. On the contrary, we really need to create businesses that are capable to be. Youknow, sustainable in every sense, not only economically, about socially, anEnvironmentaly and and in our industry. This is is becoming really the top item in every Co'sagender. In episode, three, it was Luca Prosalti, the chief business innovationofficer for MSC cruises. Now, an entire rething needed in his industry witheyes on the future and coming back stronger magnes asked Luca what it is.That's important about, encouraging and nurturing a culture of innovation.Culture Denominator for innovation is really being a interprenerial in theapproach you manage the businesss so because, if you're, an Interprenera, you havethe mindset of being flexibe, N, Anagil and being able to take a risk and tolook forward and to think differently, because because, by definition, ifYouare in interpenere you don't you want od to succeed with your ofbusiness and in order to do dating, need to be to be the competition and tobe perceived a different by the clients. So is byinge. By definition, you aresomeone that is, is open to see things from a different perspective to take arisk step further into the GISK, because you want to succeed. So to meyou know, even if Youare a manager and...

...even if Youare, working within anorganization and corporation, a big organization, if you apply and ifyou're able obviously be to be, you need to have also a bit of you knowfeeling and the character for that. But if you are able to apply aninterprenerial approach in Your Business Day by their business 'm, I'm convinced that you will be moresuccessful in in innovating and Tusforming in your company. So a lot of people argue that you know.Innovation is just a sern up pity or it just happened, but it seems that thatyou have a pretty structure approach. So, in your experience, what isimportant, if you, if you want to Insta, realize in struct innovation and notjust let it happen if it happen. Well, I mean innovation by definition,as we said before, something that does not exist, so is the responsibility ofthe manager and the exective managing the nelation to strantor theprocess in the best way, according to the the ecosystem and the environment wherehe or she is operating. But in general you know you, you needto be quite a ecritical person in order to put together stratter from one sidebut at the same time a carativity from the other one, because, for example, innovation for me andsalso going out of the offics and being onside the company in order to get at the right level of contaminationfrom people around the group from companies Ar UND Ergrownd. But thatcould give you a completely differentperspective on things that maybe you never realize. In episode for Andrea Alvaressu inMagnus one of the most influential people in Brazil, she had something toTura the largest cosmety brand in the country. It was a truly fascinatingchat that came back to that higher purpose angle once again and how to usethat to approach your passion and who it is. That is important in yoursuccess or failure. I think I think it would be to you know, guide your own career in yourlife with this open, curious and empathetic part and mine. I really do I think when you, when you gaaproach life and the choicesyou are making with that combination of openness of curiosity and empathy, you can develop the intellectual aspect.A lot more eastan me. I think, a lot easier than you can actually developthese things because, as a society, we put enormous pressure on the logicalintellectual, rational aspect, the hard sciences, as we call them which to methey're. Not even that hard. You can be very concepxual mathematically, but it's about you know, combiding these aspects andthen and then really people pitting people. First, it is people, you know it will be people the onesthat will do it better or worse. That will be more orless engaged that will come up with solutions are not, and when I saypeople put people first, it's also ecknowledging that we are responsible,especially as we go iirup and leadership positions for creating theenvironments in which the people are operating, and then that would maybe bemy next thought, which is make sure and theattentive that the ecosystems in the...

...environment that you are creating tomake sure that they are safe for people to be who they truly are for people tobring to work their best versions and their worst versions, because that ispart of who they are. And it is precisely in that in that individuality,that you have amazing potential for innovation for break comminto orcreativity if they feel safe. To speak up to ask questions to bring weirdideas to the table to voice out concern. In episode five, it was Carl Magnisoring Swedish cerial entrepreneur founder of world attracts, which is astarttup focusing on innovating logistics with electric tracks. Magnusraised the subject of parallel entrepreneurship and what the benefitsof working that way, along with the theory of the constraints, creatingsomething new from something old and, of course, his take on the opportunityof working with an increased electrification in so many aspects ofour lives. Here's what he had to say, your Portunity with the electric, isexactly what you said: Fe Moving ports, less need ofselves and maintenance,hopefully less need on spare ports and so on, and so you have to think, I think think your business momel hasto be different. We all know that Eve, fom, Co, manufacturies in the classicworld and also tract manufactures, the very being part of their bottom line,comes from ofter sale, serveys, maintenance, spare pords and all that and in the electric future. THAT'S NOTWHY WERRING! You will make your money if we look at a sustainable perspective. That I think is is super, and that iswhat we try to do as we will guarantee up time. So we will guarantee that ifImean, like you know, Musk e saying I mean principally you don't have to gofor serviceever in in the adear world. Our tracks would last fifty years andthey will never have to be serviced, no maintenance, no sparfoxer and, of course, as we want to maintaincontrol of the ownership of the tracks, we have all incentives to to buildtracks that will last as long as possible, which is good sustainability.We also have them to consider how, at the end of life, how do we? What can werecycle? How do we do their second life for pateries Etca? So I think ourbusiness moder thand sustainability goes handing hat and- and I think that is of course I mean if you have a profitline that is depending on on bynd and throw away that is not sustainable, and so so Ithink that's that's very good. We then have to, of course, look at. We have tomake money out of fieling tracks or renting out tracks and so on, but it'swe can. We have to look at the total, basically lifetimeof the track and andsee that that makes sense. We think that we are coming already to what theycall TCO, so total Coso bornership, or to talk to you TCU total use of cost of usage that is comparable overtime or better than decen. Sothat's of course why we, when we come when the industry come to that tippingpoint, then there is no. I mean there 's, no way back, FASIC and hopefully orright now theyre inincentives, and you know things like that and and t band fof these sell anso on that is helping else in the stort...

...but overtime. There is no tha. Weshould be compared in episode: Six brantz Cooper, The New York Times bestselling author of the Len endrepreneur and CEO of moves, the needle, an expertin bringing new technologies to the market and a man who ignites innovationin industry magnus got him to expand on that importance of culture ininnovation and led us back to talking once again about that higher purpose.The culture is everything right, and so, but culture is not a slogan. Culture S,the behavior of the people inside the organization, and so culture can't havebeen top down. We literally, I had this. This client that very senior individual in it actually aEuropean medical device company and- and you know you sort of- was declaringfrom on Nig. You know we must be agile and he he would ask meol like why can'tI just declare that we be more agile and people go, be more agile and I wellyou know we actually have to. We have to work on the behavior, and that meanstraining and practicing meads, defining what we won't Sema andand of course, there's multiple layers of that right. You have to build inwhat is the new role of middle management when you have people thatare behaving differently on the ground and and leadership hase to behave indifferent ways. So it's great to declare it, but you know that's likethat's the beginning of the job best of it, the really hard Slo. The longjourney is changing this behavior, so that the CULTR that you want emergesfrom that. It's a lot of statiti consultants outthere and they delivering like this. You know great strategies on powerpoints and them most companie saled execute on it. So e. have you seen that it may besometime better to change his stratety base on your Calter, then try to changethe calter based on a new certaity yeah. I think that I mean I actuallydon't do what a the few consultants in the world hat maybe doesn't do strategyet. It almost bears me because of how often that fails- and it's almost I don't know this is maybe not fair,but it's almost lazy right. I mean it's really not that difficult to sit arounda board table and come up with a new strategy. I mean that's kind of theeasy part of it yeah, and so I think that the hard work again gets back tothe behavior, and so I do think that there is a strateggic element to it,because you know leadership. The vision that what we're just not going to do istell you exactly how we're going to do it a rather matter of Factin, my oldbook. You know from from two thousand and thirteen the lean entereepreneur,what I would talk about, Mith of the visionary in the mid of the visionary.Is You know this idea that you Hav you read te moment and is like yeah and andnow you must n deliver that d to The market and people love to use SteveJobs and Thomas Edison, and all of these other icons as examples ofvisionaries. But all of those individuals were not visionarieesbecause they have this spark of an idea and then went and executed on it theirvigenar race, because there was a specific change that they wanted tomake in the world, and then they spent their whole careers. Trying numerousdifferent ways of achieving the change for episode. Seven magnes had thepleasure of talking to Greg Spelang CEO of fancycom. That's a platform forconsumers searching for fashion and art online, which under Gregg's leadinghand, has seen an increase in order size by some fifty per cent andachieving two million active users. MAGNESTASKD Gregg. How importantinnovation was in a turnaround...

...situation? Here's the fantastic answer.He gave Oman any look it in most cases their innovationis goingto be necessary. I mean what, in my personal experience, so you ow most ofthe turnarounds I've been in, have had a similar sort of DNA in regards tofounder, came in ability to raise capital had aninitial thesis built a product or establish you know a baseline of aproduct, they got some traction and then there was a stall. You knowthings didn't move forward and you know from that perspective, did they were?They were not able to get to profitability, they weren't able toraise capital. You know the excitement of kind of being a startup startedg towear off, but there was enough there that it was obvious that the companyneeded to Survot like let's, let's take this thing to the next level. How do wedo that? And- and you know when you come into a situation like that- reallygot to identify what the blocker is in most cases, there's the blockers acrossthe board from sales customer support. You know maybe overall product strategy,you know where the product its in the marketplace, but for us to besuccessful there has to be invation on some sort. I mean we have to evolve thecompany, so you know, I think you talked a lot about it in your new book,which is fantastic and built. On, probably you know the sort of einnovators to lan like it has to be that comfort with with sort of jumpingthe gap and going to whear the pucks going, not where it's been and anddriving the company T do that point. But you know if you're not willing tochange you're, not willing to innovate and not willing to do thingsdifferently. There's no reason to think that the companyis going to ever besuccessful, especially in a turnaround situation. So fancy raised quite much money in theirpast and maybe I wasn't innetially that successful in e. getting the rightTringal traction because they have to defend the high valuation, then, over time things got better and you work with the helping them to takethem to the next level, and I guess doing that. You really need to makeeverybody, not just yourself and your team everybody to go Nextta Mile in acompany. How do you do that? How do you motivatepeople to really do that? Yeah? No, you know is ha. Is I look back on myexperiences and is might be relevant for people who are in your audience?You know I came out of you know business school and you know formalizedtraining and you know, and, and I experiene I was an entrepreneur earlyin my career and when I, when I first you know, startedto get putting I this situation. It was somewhat accidental. The turnaroundthing was accidental T it wasn't, it wasn't planned. I just got brought intoa company. It is, I think, my my first, even though we were successful, some ofthe scars that I have that I've learned from is, I would almost approach thesebusinesses like a business case like a Harvard business case. Here's ourassets, here's what the EXTA markets doing, here's, what we need toaccomplish movement, you know, and it's like chess pieces. You know we're goingto cut this division off here. We're going to invest here, we're going toyou W go after this market here, there's Someti there's some light spaceover here, and even though I was right in a lot of cases or youknow, any executive coming in could be very right with a rational. It wasbuilt. You know the the strategy, s sound if your people or the peoplethere aren't willing to follow you or don't believe in it to or don'tunderstand why you're doing it's going to be very, very difficult to besuccessful, so what I've evolved to, and I think that you knowGow. What I think about myself is a leader with he, the organization, I'vegotten so much better is...

...the ability to create that visionacross the organization that share purpose, where the team not justunderstands where we're trying to go, which is you know, unbelievablyimportant that we're all aligned and there's a lignment across yourorganization with whate. The goal is but there's a feeling of of why? Why why I want to be a part ofthis? Why I'm excited to go on this journey with you and then once you'reable to get that sort of concsive group of people that are all have a sharecommon goal? Your strategy is going to be much moresuccessful and- and I think the KBE part of that is, you know a it'ssetting that goal that they buy in on, but be making sure that they feel likethey're part of it, and that we're building this thing together and Ithink once you do that you're going to find into you know organizationaleffectivenes going to go through the roof. In episode, Aigt, FrederickAnderson Entrepreneur Turnaround, specialist and global transformer, aman who turns things into what you never believed possible. That said,it's not always playin sailing. There are things that go less well in anyprocess, so magnus raised the subject that had come up in previous episodesabout that all important relationship with failure. Here's what he had to saymy personal relationship, I always say I've fairly. Ninety nine times by ahandred did its a catastrophe, and that goes fo. My Personal Bak Ani as ago myprofessional life, but I also train myself to be compassionate about myself.It is how life is right and I cannot change that, but I can always try toimprove by curosity when it comes to coaching those involved, for instancein impossible, pastic or other people that I talk to privately orprofessionally. I think that be prepared. The fastter,you accept that you will do more te fault and errors. Then you do rights, don't put too much pressure on yourselfbecause it paralyzes you and you become anally new control function and itprevents speed if you' not with speed and pilotine. It doesn't mean that youshould be a Recklett. You need people around you, and you also need to beaware yourself, but you need to manage risk set the paramedes for what riskyou can take, and then you work quickly to go tough deck of idays, because onlyone oof hundred, I believe, is going to be pruitful, but too many people spent too much timeon say. This is thearly e, stick to the idea and they drill down and they don'thave the ability to kill their dorm. They just cling to it and plunge downmoney time and then ithe Ende Ze didn't work. If you apply this reasoning to thesituation that the world it's in right now with a pandemical andno one really knows what will have happened post pandemic, I guess a verybad advice would be to go back to the roots and go back to what he did beforethe pandemic. I still think people think like that they plan for go backto an old normal. Why most likely it will be a total new situation. If youapply your thinking to that, what advice swould you give to peoplelistening to the school to be ready to get back in the saddle of threpademag yeah. I think you- and I discussed one about this.What will happen after the SANDEMIC wild be? Will it be like ofto, thepenatial crisis in the thudies, which was the disaster, or will it be thefeeling on the street in New York when thesecond World War was over? I think that that's the big potentiallthat people would feel relieved and they would said wow now we have any dyto go again and when you have energy, I think that you have that possibility tobecome more free, an your thinking and...

...that will in nidself enable people tothink in new ways how it will be shaped or how it will bedone. I think that no one really know and it's just to again sorry staycurious and you will be able to detect what's going on on the street andthat's where you find the new trends and that's where you find the newpeople, but that has a good ideas for the future, so we are staying ittentiveand I've been listening to a few fewas one.One of the Gurs I listen to podcast O is SOM Harris. His is ha veryintelligent guy and another guy that ID admire quite a lot as you Illoharari,and when you listen to them that it's they also are into this. That humanityhas the best time, maybe possibly ever so. If we stay true to what what welike and what we want to go and have a directional set, then then we, I thinkthe future Camsan pretty good. It was in episode nine that Magnus caught upwith Melissa rancourt with her encheprenaurial skill. She foundedgreen hat, which encourages young women to develop and study, stem topics,science, technology, engineering and mathematics, and that has alreadyreached fifty thousand students and families. Magmus also got Melissa toexpand on that fear of failure, or rather fear, of not succeeding. Thiswas Melissa's take of it, like you said, I think it's also a cultural one can beby geography can be also by our experiences. It can be by our education,any number of things, and I think that fear goes into a lot, which is the fearto start the fear, to succeed even the year to grow the fear to play bold. Youknow to come back to the title of your book because I think this holds us backand it and it creates the mistd opportunities, and I think ifwe take a look at what could be- and I think that also wat- you know, asthe entrepreneur had that I putot that I put on often during the day. I do say something you know that reallydrives me is that what really pushes me to go beyond and go beyond fear is whensomeone tells me it's not possibleoh. Yes, it is yeah. I like that one one of the oler guest, the Indigrantis,a professor in anthropology and she's actulycreating, her own resume offailure, and she said exactly same thing. If someone want to motivate methat FELM, it's not possible, I like that. That's down tePreneuralvin and I think it goes very much into innovation as well. So when you work with all you, you knowthe students teksicatives an and a I cosulte were o tepreneur for thatmatter. Ut in your experience, what are the biggest hoddls to really create sustainable growsh to becomesustainable and still grow? At the same time, what is him being mostOrganizatos, I think most is actually having too much experience in whatthey've already done. So I find that, especially when youtalk about it on an industry level that, when they're looking to innovate,they look at other organizations in the same industry and that's where Ibelieve one of the biggest missdopportunities are. So. I thinkthat the possibilities that we have is to doa little bit of a crazy thing, and that is think about a completely differentindustry or even combine it, and that's where you, you end up being very daring,and you end up innovating to a totally different direction. In fact, in ourprogram when we get together and we're always doing creative tools and designtools and so forth, I design, as...

...especially those tools to help us tothink in a very different direction. What, if this company in this companymerged? What would be the results? What if this industry worked like thatindustry? What would be the result and that's where I think that that thatopportunity for creative ideas abounce it was episode ten that Magnus caughtup with Gary perself with an exceptional background, a man who isnow a principal at innovation, thes, Canadian operation, working regionallyand internationally with finseck Magnus posed the question: Why is innovationso important yeah? I think here is where I find the frameworks that we'vedelloped inside in a Va thr n, sixty ver very, very helpful, because what they do is reinforce the fact thatinnovation is a really important part and a life blood of thrivingorganizations and thriving regions. Ot. We sort of go back to the previousquestion. People think about innovation asesidiation really, and it's not just that. You know like stick it going in aroom and put the Otler stickies in the wall and stuff, it's an important part,but isn't the only thing? And I like to say that I you know that's that ideasare places that need attention, but there are lots of ideas that the reallythe trick is to figure out where you. What how why and WHO and make sure that you've got thatright. So as an orgunization, it's about being clear owhere! You want togo thinking in the end about how you're going to do that o from strategy through thecommercalization, and if you figure that out and you are able to pivot as theindustries evolve, then your organizations can be around for a longtime, and so for me, that's that's why inovations important, because it's acritical part of your a longterm present in a market or other markets ofan artization, and without that we have lots of examples of Fortu five hundred companies that last,for you know a minute and a half because of the fact they haven't reallythought forward and innovated te way that they could. I guess that when you work across differentindustries and als in your case Radience, I guess you can see commonpatterns when it comes to to change and trust,Emeton and innovation, maybe RESISTENC. So what kind of parters do you see youtypically when you work with with this this issues that has Odo with growthand change? So so what I find is there absolutelyis a pattern you know there is. There is a commonality across industries andwhen I work in the faantial service industry, there are Actually v a numberof different verticales within the industry, and you know there are peoplethat would argue that insurance is different from banking and like that,and there is a a difference in the product, but really when you thinkabout it, it's all about people- and you know, human behavior and structure-are the the most important part and that you can see across industry. SoO'F late, I've been doing work in the manufacturing and traplicationenvironment and infinancial services and in a a while there'se, not a lot ofheavy machinery. Actually there's some in the FNANTIUAL servicof space. Youknow the the actual innovation process and the way people need tothink about it. Whatever and the way people behave inside. You know thecapturing hearts and mind stuff is very similar and it all comes down tocommunication and whatever. So so. I think about innovation, O somethingthat you have to work together to accomplish and so o. How do you do that is very similar, in my view, acrossorganizations, industries and countries? So so here's here's how I think aboutit and you'll see a little some themes that might be similar to the stuffwe've talked about before. But to me, there's four important stepsstep. One is driving an agenda with a...

...coherent strategy that reflects theorganizations, capabilities and we've talked about this a lot and that you,you can't accomplish something. If you don't have the capabilities toaccomplish it, step two is setting the stage forsuccess by really understanding and addressing the needs of your clientsand your internaf resources and agreeing to a set of needs in adirection. Third, one is focing on executing whatyou've promised and and often that's where people jumpto after the first meeting, so they get to executing and they really haven'tspent the time energy to really understand the oterline needs, andsometimes at the end of the step. Three: that's where people stop, in my view,there's a forcstep, and that step is to make a point ofasking your clients if theyare satisfied, trying learn from the experiencage ofhad with them and look for ways to exceed those expectations. With newsuggestions on how that you can help going forward. That for step, I think,is the one of the biggest differentiators between the companiesthat I've been involved with and how successful they can be versus others who sort of jump quicklyto execution, declare completion and then move on to the next initiative. In episode, Eleven Magnus was joined byHenrick Friebman, an innovation professor, I HM Business, SchoolanEntrepreneur, passion for individuals, learning and business and the man whotranslated the art of war. He chatted about what lessons can be learned fromthe past to carry us into the future. Now magnes asked him his thoughts aboutbalancing the long term and shorterm when it came to planning for the future.Here's what Henri had to say. Oh that's a big question. I mean that's theCharlenge for everyone in senior leadership to jump between. It's like aBundy jump between long term and short term commitements, and I mean it's soeasy to fall into the daily business and theyre againd off today, but atthat time, that's when you actually have to step up and take your ruleasselater to give room, space and resources to actually thinking ahead,thinking, forehead and also, if Youask, R, your employees, that's one of themost important part to build an or strong organization. That is that youhave a clear vision that you have a clear mission and I mean first time Iwas hearing that in school. I thought that okay, you do that. You sign offthe paper and it's done no, it's when you're living that when you reallybelieve and commit yourself to y, as you said, before, a higher purpose, andthat means that you can't just do the things in the short term. You haveyoualso work with the long term of this interesting part is that my tees iswhen I was John Grad at PhD SCO was about time awareness in statitedecisions, the iportant lessons from that studycame out with that. A lot of people doesn't have the time or the capabilityto think that far ahead, that was even one of the conclusionsthat came out that my boss had worse time, study time awareness. Then thecleaning, lady that I had as a pilot thest for my studies, ND, my boss wasnot that excited about the result, but it's telling you something. This is askill set, and this is also talent. So you have to pick people that actuallycan move themselves between time and space and that's that's important. Ifyou have to be an Organizationi movement and the society we are livingin today, we have to move a lot. We have to continuas you be on the roadfor moving and then you have to think...

...the head. I don't waste. Your last nowhope I've held your focus for this little walk through season to becausefocus is what it was all about: Fo Episode, twelve, Christina Bangston, amaster of Focus, a well champion, precision, shooter and so many otherthings. Besides with a conversation that focused on focus and it'srelevance to keeping your ideas both relevant and moving forward. One of thequestions Magnus asked so Christina explained how, when there's a decisionto be made that you can't predict the outcome, for how should you and how doyou approach it yeah it comes back to to, as you say, military perspective where we have thisold fashioned perhaps, but it's really interesting still to to highlight thatexpression that taking a decision, even though it'swrong it's better than not taking a decision at all. Yes, I agree especially N in timeswhere something is really dangerous, which it can be inindifferent military operations. That's where it comes from. If you stand still, the enemy will hit you. So it's kind ofobvious and from a focus perspective, it's actuall easier to come into sharpness discipline andfocus if there is a direct threat upon you, but nowadaysyou know we don't really live in the military operations. Well, in the military we do and in somebusiness cases we do, but there is a large amount of time that is, for the administative part in everyday life within theorganization and again in everyday life. Also from a private perspective, I believe we need to bring in theprivate perspective, like you just did into the business. It goes hand in handmuch more now, perhaps than it did before. Taking choices is important.Perhaps it's even more important to learn to to say no, that's also achoice. I believe that we are so used to decide what we need to do and to take choices to be able to getsomewhere and we want to take choices fast, because otherwise someone else istaking that choice, perhaps or we are afraid of almost beingforgotten. I live about this because I think of I might lose track now, but I promisedto come back. Ask The focus expert, I'm thinking about it was a year agowhen the pademic started and many of my friends who work, if I'mallowed to say only as speakers or lectures got afraid, because theycouldn't come out to the audience anymore and they started to to directlyyum jump into the digitil world where they started to, if I'm allowed to say, produce quickfix, because they wereafraid of being fordotten. So they thought that they needed to be seenevery now and then on the Internet in different platforms. I indeed, ofcourse the opposite. I realized that HM my position is to be a focus expert. Iam against quick fix. I do not support quickfix. I resist to respond topeople's superficiality and nowor days, onl the Internet. Wehave so much that goes fast, that is quick fix and if we support that wellwewill never get get away from it. So I took another way and I was silentand no one has forgotten me so again, that's also a choice, so Ifeel like asking the opposite: Can a...

...choice sometimes be to decide to donothing, because what we need to do also in this discussion of takingchoices, and how do you take choices is to to give ourselves time to reflect. Iknow in your book you mention in the very first beginning, or maybe it's inthe pre face Peter Drucker, ther refereth referenceto Peter Drucker, and he said many shark things one of the things she saidit was that we need time to reflect, and I think about reflecting upon theErar we live in today is that it makes me think als of there was anauthor in on Tho nine tundred n, sixty nine who wrote his he was Swedish. Hewrote a book called the restless man and I'm thinking if we were restlessthen well. What are we so now because to be able to take the whitechoises, we need to give ourselv space and time to reflect, and I think goingback to the private part. How can we learn from our own families from our children, from our wife, fromour men or from the one we are living with, or our closest friends to give another person isn't the bestthing you can give aother person? Isn't that time and attention- and this is focus because when you giveanother person time and attention- and it could be your employees- you givethem a space where you interact, where you find sharp solutions and where yougo back into your core values, your cordentities, you give yourself the ability to reflect upon what reallyis important and you you create a space, a focus space where you free from allthese distractions. All these things that wants to grab your attention allthe time, and I think this is something we can become much better upon orbetter in whatever you say in Englishan to create space in which we can reflect so some fascinating conversations,which brings us to a close of not only this best off episode for season to,but also the close of this season will be back with more, but on behalf ofMagnus and all his guests. Of course. Thank you so much for listening and welook forward to having you back for season. Three Wi should see magnus backbehind the microphone after the summer and until we speak again, stay safe andplay bold.

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