Play Bold: Holiday Special

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

It has been 17 fantastic interviews with NASA executives, space designers, priests, Islamic leadership experts, super entrepreneurs, professors from the world leading universities, Hollywood folks, authors, and experts on innovation and transformations, as well as corporate executives. All possible perspectives are now compiled into the last episode of the first session of Play Bold. It is thought-provoking, fun, entertaining and features unbelievable stories that have never been revealed before. Listen and share with the world.

For all of you waiting for the book “Play Bold,” the launch date is now set for February 2nd. The next session of the podcast, Play Bold, starts on January 21st. In the meantime, Happy Holidays.

Hello Hoho and welcome to the playboltholiday special, whether you're joining us for the first or the seventeenthtime. This is the holiday' special edition of Magnus penkers playboldpodcast, where magnis takes a well earned break he's been very busy. Youknow, and that means you get to enjoy snippets of exvertes from across theguests. That magnus has been speaking to he's been speaking to these guestsahead of his new book titled by Loco Incidents Play Bold and that you shouldfind available wherever you buy or download your books from its officialrelease date being February, wo thandand twenty one, but you can getfull information by visiting innovation. T re, hudred and sixtycom forward playbold now play bold and Hel to win the business game through creativedestruction also comes with a forward written by Philip Coler who admits,despite knowing magnus, and their shared thoughts on the innovationprocess, was a little reluctant to do the forward when he first read theChapter List, because it contradicted a lot of his own long held beliefs. Butafter reading the book he was glad he had and then went to endorse andencourage business owners, enchepreneurs inchepreneurs to read andembrace it. Some of those chapter titles that raised Phillip's eyebrowsinclude everything will be destroyed. Even your business, don't listen toyour customers, kill the Unchepreneur to save the company. COFERAT emptybodies, attack and kill ellovation playing it save is the most dangerousthing you can do anyway. You know what to do. Get yourself a cofey and alsolook forward to more upcoming in depth, interviews from the brigcest minds ininnovation on the playbold podcast. As for what we've already heard on thefirst seventeen episodes of the podcast, yes, seventeen episodes already, let'stake a look back- The playvold, podcast holiday special there's, no doubt thatthe year we've all just experienced has been unprecedented for all the obviousreasons and whether you're looking back disbelievingly on the one, that's justgone or hopefully more optimistically on the year to come. You might bewondering just how innovation can plat a role in what's to come either for youas an individual or perhaps the business journey. You're about toembark on in this episode, Magnus has put me Im- is producer by the way GregI'm in the hot sea and have compiled some of the pearls of wisdom that havebeen shared so far, so without any further delay. Let me offer the firstof my audio gifts from Magnus, with the chats that he's had now. There were so many highlights togo through and choose from so many leading, though provokers from theworld of innovation and beyond in what's been a year that has forced manyto do what they do from their homes, as Dr City found out. Although she comesup in the highlights, as well shortly from episode fifteen reminding us thatthe clock is ticking down to what will hopefully be a more stable year for USanyway. As for that working from homething for Dr City have a listen tothis sat dehiat in obligation to God and that it's not only the Istoly inthis world that TAT is possible or theysurty responsible in the next world.Now doctor says he was a guest in episode. Fifteen, like I just said, butit wasn't for her clock chiming incident that I wanted to lead with herfor it's a fantastic interview overall, but she also captured so passionatelywhat innovation three sixty means in terms of making the changes we need inthe world. This is what she had to say now: iunovition Well Foiw, what Iunderstand O dovition and I have been involved in in nomision in an differentdifferent ways. From auganization...

...perspective, it is very critical nowand that has to be applied to fix the Woll. And how do we do that? There's amount of misperception about innovation from what andstand, in terms of thepublic, the understady s that innovation has to do with technologyonly which is not the case and II. Think I like the model of innovation.threed sixty, because we're looking at every espect of the Organization of theinstitution is very comprehensive that we we culd affougt to miss appoints.This is what happens when we start to lose tiht of certain things and hwebecome Deran, and then we break growth, so indevision Tisisisas every espect of criteria that are very important in an institution. Welook at environment situations, maybe more at the level of thei country. Ifnot the world. It is high time realy to take out this tool first to understandwhat what is trying to achieve and then to to use his better dologies, because ifwe don't have tools, we don't start with a model, a concept, and we don'thave tools. How are we going to fix it its so complex, so that sets the tonefor Magnus's upcoming book and for the work he and his team do without anyfurther ado. Let's take a recap through some of the other guests. That magnusis chatted to over the course of the podcast and while the first episode explainedwhat it was about and why he was doing it. Episode too saw magnis chattingwith the first of his guests. Lafe Ed Vinsen, professor of some of the mostprominent universities in the world, was Askva maclus about navigatingturvulent waters. Leyfe had the perfect answer to the structural approach foran organization yeah, I think you had have a good proach in your book and thethree sixty addressing it. You have to look at probably not only three sixtybut seven twenty, where you add a continuously growing thee, sixtyperspective, which is actually the longitude from another viewpoint, andwith doing that, we need to reorganize. So in my work with intellectual capital,you have human capital as one part of it. You have real relations andcustomer cacicars another one, but the bridge between those two that is alsocalled organizational capital or infrastructure, and this is probablythe most critical dimension down the road. It's so easy to crack it bysaving and having cost Reductionis program, but to get thes spaceship upthere with a fourth rocket. You need an infrastructure for it, and the equaliteorganization ACAPITA and with the new Internet dimensions, pay so muchinteresting opportunities coming up for this. So the future is not lineary.It's very much a wave and Forthemorra, as you mention it earlier. This wavealso relates to the smell. The smell is a wave like water, and if you learn toplay with the waves, you can actually engineer the smell like they do in theperfect film industry. The problem might be that the engineers are nothappy with the waves. They want to have a flat, very easily travel on a flatroad, but the world is not flat, so you have to navigate with the big waves,and that is the leadership that you aske about also to work with. The waves.Magnuss then asked, as we all look towald the future now and how best toapproach that, from a personal perspective, something that we hope youall endeavour to achieve a happy future.

Usually it comes in a phrase that I say HappyFuture and the happy future is the endoorpins kicking in your head to lookfor a enjoyable next step. Another one which is very close is that theknowledge is not in the books. It's Sen, your next step and episode. Three Maguscaugts up with Jose Perez an executive coach in innovation, sustainabilitywith organizations including Sony and Nesley. On his experience list. Hecaptured a great technique in influencing change within anorganization with a well established infrastructure. It's not always thebest way to insist on changing this that and the other. There is anotherway Josay's way I become a bit of a mole. I join you in your journey andthen once we're walking together, I tri to move you in different directions,because if I come in right up front and tell you, the innovation is complex,interconnected systems and we need to create an environment where great ideasand great people can connect. You know I may get fired after the first meetingand I don't want that. So I want you. I want to tounderstand you. I want to seewhere you're going I'll go along with you and then once we develop that thatI understand that the direction you're taking we can implement innovation toamplify that we can implement innovation, to discover new paths thatwe can go down, but I think it's very important that we meet. We areempathetic to organizational culture and empathetic to the CEO's rule intothe business little role in that organization and their objectives andthen meet them where they're at and then shape the new diraction together.Because innovation, as you know, is not an event, is not a training session.It's a journey. You know, as I mentioned before, you know. I thoughtit would be Therin a certain organization for two or three years Ispent twelve years and the end and that journey and that's a challenge by theway of organizations in the United States, for example, because theaverage co is spaiding three or four years as the leader of theirorganization and that's not a whole lot of time to really build a culture ofinnovation that last you have to. You have to do the best you can toinfluence people in that direction. Ave an episode for this OL Taras Crowcheck,Zen, philosopher, martial, ARF expert designer technologist and the developerof the taform motorcycle. Well, he chatted all things sustainable, evenhow his motorcycle is made using cutting edge, green mobility and smartsconnectivity all on two wheels. He revealed what he believes to be theideal approache to a sustainability goal, using new technology to use ECOfriendly materials to create wait for it. A biodegradable fossil fuel, freemotorcycle how's, this for elevation yeah, and this is in reality, not a newconcept. A lot of furniture designers have been using this for over a hundredyears. So if you work closely with natural materials, you understand wherethey come from, you understand their limitation and their potential, so thebeauty of natural materials is that they are natural, become from thenatural world, but also they require a little bit more attention and care forthem to make them long lasting. So because of science, we developedsynthetic materials that come usually from patrollum industry and plasticsare amazing, like we've built our modern civilization on plastics, butnow is ie time to start rethinking the way, we're making things, because wehave enough understanding of material science that we can actually usenatural materials that are high performance and bio based. So we nowfor the first time- and you know, since in this realization we can actuallycreate competing materials that are natural. They can compete withpetroleum, based so being inspired by...

...the furniture design where a lot ofnatural fibers are used to create various sort of composite fooking partssuch as guitars and chairs. The idea was well, you know, if you can make achair out of this, why can't Syou make a motorcycle ois, so we startedprototyping some parts on the bike and use essentially a natural fiber weavethat is made out of flag seat Tho, see that you put in your Ginoda. So whathappens? Is You cring the seat down and you create a cloth looking texture or afabric that you Tlat, you impregnate with H, resid and we used a biobasedresid and then for color. Instead of using toxic bigness, we used algentright PIGMAS, so the results essentially three part constructionthat is fully recyclable and fully bitegrade. In episode, five, when wereflect on a year where the word moon shop became a more common phrase,Magnus caught up with John SA's former C to of the Johnson Space Center, heexplained what it's like to send people into space, knowing they might not comeback. John shared insights and lessons learned from leading moonshot projectsMagnus asked him what advice he gives t entreprenaus seeking imput into theirideas, be open minded okay, surround yourself with peoplethat think differently, okay and then and create a culturewhere diverse opinions and healthy debate or expected. Okay, I mean you'rethe entrepreneur, you ere the executive okay, so you have the final say: okay,so it's not like you Y ut's, not that you're oing to lose control. Okay, butcast a wide net for the answer and seek those diverse opinions if theyandlisten listen to a variety of people, not just a few of the your topexecutives, so thate's one set of things. The other is is: Is this talkabout values? Okay, so I mean discuss and live your core values and actuallylive them. Trust your people, it's just one of the core values- is trust, trustyour people and e. This does involve releasing some level of control, buttrust your people, but you hire some of the best people, trust them, trust yourpeople and able to trust you- and I think last thing I would suggest is just toremember that your integrity is foundational. Okay- and I don't knowhow better to say this, but you know your integrity, take it takes years toachieve. You could take years to achieve and you cand lose it in aninstance always be mid for that integrity is foundation ould because anwithout it. You have nothing and by way of a creative SLANC in episode, sixMagnus caught up with Jack Roberts, Hollywood producer, actor performance,alartist and Parsons New School of design. Professor, let's face it whenwe're innovating, we're creating so who better to tell us how to storyboard ourupcoming journey and overcome challenges and to be the hero of yourown story. I think first, the first thing is: We have to do two things, onewe have to empathize with ourselves. We have to actually see ourselves as thethe hero of our own story right, so many people really look at others todictate their story. They're really affected by the winds of change insidethe emotions and reactions of other people. What is this person doing? Am Idoing it as good as they are they're inside that world of comparison andthere's in no way is that person the hero of their own story, something Ilike to share when I teach a storytelling workshop to a group ofExecutives, which I often do with the CEA level? Is there really only twokinds of stories in the world? I had an old screenwriting professor share withme this. The person who comes to town, the stranger who comes to town right sothe whole town's reacting to that, and...

...then the person who goes on a journeyand one of those is a reactionary story. It's the town is the is the are thepeople it's happening to and and the stranger the town is happening to themand in the second story, the person going on a journey theyre the hero oftheir story and they're happening to the world, and I think that's thethat's really. The biggest key magnus is to when you're building your ownsort of personal story. You know, Palo Quelu calls it personal legend in thealchemist if you've ever read it, and the idea is that that you havesomething to give the world of value that you are something of value andthen how does that play out in story form? And so, when you create that sortof story really all the story is, is a set of beliefs right. There are set ofconstructs and beliefs about the world that tell us some kind of some kind ofseries of fortunate or unfortunate events. So when I think it's important when weare inside our daily life and in the business world, especially in timeslike now that we craft a personal narrative and that personal narrativeneeds to not just have have us as the hero of that story happening to theworld, but has to really kind of flush that out like what does that look likeif I have a corte purpose? Well, that can take many many forms. It's notattached to a certain job. It's not attached to a certain thing. Forexample, my corte purpose is to ennevate thehuman story. Well, I can do that when I write screenplace, which I do I can dothat when I write novels, which I do I can do that when I write non fictionbooks, which I do when I teach classes, which I do when I consult businesses oninnovating sort of storytelling inside their organization, and so it's notattached to a certain form, because that that story is really me and, likeyou mentioned, that person carries from asscurved as cur es carv right and youhave to have a story. That's strong enough that you can do that withresiliency, otherwise that it just crumbles. It crumbles around you, anthe world, happens to you and you end up in that that victim cycle that we'veseen so many times I' Lat led us son to episode seven, where the awardwinningStemford Harvard Rise and northwestern Professor, Dr Lynw Phillips, gave anepich interview where he discussed what it was like to have. The world's fullriches person in the planet in his Class Lyn also discusses how hedeclared victory over his cancer, where he had a five per cent chance ofsurvival and gave his perspective on how to create true customer value thatgoes far beyond the boardroom. How to bounce back against the odds and Lynehas truly lived that experience. He gave a great answer when it comes toyour personal and Corporate Strategic Plan in these challenging times. Ithink that there's you know one piece of advice: that's absolutely crucial inthis fast changing landscape- and that is, you know, stress test. Whateveryour strategic plan is stress, testin stress, tested against the powerfulconverging forces that are taking place to create a a new game. CompetitiveLandscape is my colleague, Gordon Hewett refers to it us a new game.Competitive Landscape is one on which the model for value creation forcustomers and shareholders is radically changing due to a convalence, theconflence of inconvergence of powerful outside forces, whether it's digitaltechnologies, change in the environment, change in customers, value, hiearchies,etceter etce, so adopt an outside in customer centric approach to stresstesting your strategy in that kind of landscape to avoid being the disrupted,as opposed to the DISRUPTE. That's crucial for every business leader forevery business unit for every business team. It was episode eight, when Magluschattered in depth, with Louise Callumberg, a theologist trained to bea priest Taske with being a digital transforber, creating intelintsregional execution platforms to elevate...

...entrepreneurship and sustainable growthin society. She also touched on their ECO friendly approach and how that alsoties in with a sense of theological responsibility in helping to look afterour planet and how that couples with innovation and digitalization. You haveto think about that. We have just one planet and that's one of why we have tocare about innovation and digitalization, but that, because bothmethod of innovation, the method of the ditelisation can help us to make theworld a better place for everybody, and you also have to think about how to usethe resources at the planet to make us live. Lon and the next generation, andalso another theological point of view, is what is your human? A human is aperson that can think about good things and bad things, and if you have a storyabout that, we have to save the planet together or make a better place foreverybody, stoff killing each other, or something like that. You know thebigger picture, the bigges story. You also seek to the good in every peopleand a you and me, and everybody else has a choice every day to think about.How can I you know, help us to move to that point, and I think thatwe really need that bigger to what in our world to not think that someoneelse is going to make it or do this the playvold podcast holiday special. So that's one of the theological pointof views that I am having and I'm kind of into having another discussion inthe society that I work in about responsibility and I think in changingtimes you always have to raise that question. What is our responsibility ashuman? If we have the CAP capossibility to choose good and bad things? We alsohave the freedom to do that because it's basically the freedom to choose.If you want to do good or if you want to make things, that's good for noteverybody or someone else, and this is not easy questions. That's why you haveto have that discussion op every time, because if you think something is goodand I don't think it's good, then you have to you know, have the language andway of speaking to one another and maybe a higher purpose together to seekthem out so that that's why I think we need innovation and digitalization andcan make it a drive even when they think about it. In a O teological pointof view, it was episode line when Magnis chattered in depth, with IsicAngle, break a member of the South African National Advisory Council ofElovation and the executive innovation director of the city of TeshoineMetropolita municipality. He shared his insights on getting people back to avery uncertain post, covid lintine future. He introduced us all to theimportance and meaning of a Buntu. A person is a person because of otherpeople and also stress the importance of listening to people's ideas anddoing something about them. He's one of the pearls of wisdom. He shared asimple but hugely cost saving digitalization initiative. I have madealso many mistakes in the past, where I would see people and they come up withideas or various things, and I kind of place them in a box to say no e cancan't really be an innovator, and then you see after a few months is the bestiunovateing organization, or you see a specific idea, and the one example Iremember was also in in escom. Magnus...

...is a endol where we were wit, beworking with very exciting ideas in escom and this one guy came to me andsaid it's a old idea, not a special idea, but he said why does iscom stillprint PAC slups at ha time? This was two thousand and eight includingcontract as close to forty thousand employees. I said. Well, I don't know,but I look at your idea, but this guy was persistent and I didn't do anything.You once called me out of a restaurant over weekend and said I gave you thisidea and you're not doing anything. So when I go to the office on Monday, Iask one of the team members to please listen to this guy's name. Mor Sepo,you wants us to not print PAC leps anymore, interestingly marked magnesswith it. We saw because of fortyhzard employees, escoms pin so much moneyplinting, but, more importantly, because of remote areas you would finda courier service would they have to travel over hunded Cilometes to deliverone pacelop when its delivered the receiver of the past of Said Yeah. ButI don't really need a spacelook. We did a calculation and that project enprojected to say forty five million reind in one year, just by bringingpacleps electronically and then I said to myself never underestimate any idea, rather do proper analysis and screeningof thet in them and yeah. Lastly, leaders should realize taff members,don't trust us if we say we want ideas, you will find you mighthave. Very few ideas come in, but I've seenif just take the lowest enging through the most somplistic idea, implementiand staff will suddenly say leadershould be serious about this andthen there's seen so many examples where people than come on board. Andthen you see the big the good ideas that you're looking for it was off toItaly for episode. Ten, when Morincio Grassi, a former innovation, ProfessorExperience Management, Consultant Serial Entreprenaur and now heading theHedge Fund, Ing Italy as an advisor to family businesses on buildingsustainable enterprises again in these uncertain times with life after Covid,nineteen ahead of us Magnus asked him what the future is looking like and how,as business owners, an encrepreneurs, you should approach it Wut O. I lastweek I've been in as witzerland for for business, and I saw a lot of uncertainty. Everybody istrying to see if it is a vishaped prizis, so it is at Wveshated crisis. You know, ow the Marke efinsial market will wi ebound when itwall rebound. I think that you know we don't know the future. The best thingthat we can do is bail. Thefusin is up to us to build Thi future innovation isabout building. The future is about looking at the fisure that ill want tosee. That is more probable to happen, and do it consistently bepeding itconsitive. So when comnnineteen we have to build the meaning confusure. Theonly way to spend the time in the right way is to bid the future that we aredreaming on inilliterally out of this world episode for episode. ElevenCECELIA hurts talked about how her workers impacted the way we live bybringing space technology and design back down to Earth. She is determinedto fix the planet with what we've learned from space. It was an episodethat was, as I say, literally out of this world, even leading her to talkabout Richard Branson and pants. The idea was to come up with concepts aboutfuture control, room inspired by Mission Control Center for space, butduring this project we actually identify that we could contribute withthe underwear, better underwear for the...

...steel workers. So thanks to our goldpartner, we got to do this project and also producing underwear that we calltunderwear and we identified a space texttyle that is normally integrated asone of the layers in the astronaut suits that Cann handle up to threehundred fifty degrees Celsius and the textile is by degradable and by this wecould actually offer this underwear for the steelworkers to protect them.fromparents and cars I heard rumors that rich Ar Bron, so mos acxual, thefirst one to use the PROTOTYC is that true? Actually, I was lucky to meet himwhen he was visiting Sweden for an event, and then I could give him thefirst prototype of Dunderware. So that was also very amazing and fun moment inmy life, because normally I do not give underwear two people I haven't metbefore up next was L G froyd joining Magnus for episode, twelve he's asports teacher that became a global adviser and sounding board forcompanies such as Astrazenica, and tells a fascinating story thathighlights the importance of working smarter, not harder. This is a greatexample that he shared with Maglis. It's all started where the soccerplayer Mika Loudrup Bo, the famous Danish football player one of worldbest at a time- and he said if I play more than three matches in a week, i'meactually become an inferior football player. Yes, okay, I'll be great atmatches, but I' be more a safelayer and my creativity is not so strong anymore.So it's very important for me to say that I need to train more than I havemy matches because I need to sharpen my knife. Soto say the felmaker says. Yes,if I make more than one film second year, then this bi of not a goodquality. So when the board professional said that he had three board meetingsin a week and he askd that almost every week the whole year, he was a littlebit worried and there was a question from the soccer player said. When areyou trained? What do you mean yeah when Ar you train board METI, because if youhave board metis all the time when have you got time to train your professional?Oh that's a good question. He said he was also in fact, a little bit wouldsay ashamed that he was such a high paid professional but E asactually not preparing for his profession, so much that the other twoon this panel. So when it appeared to him that this is actually a way thatI'm being a more and more safe player in my board meetings. How should I thenbe through active for changes in businesslife? How could I be a good protector of my shareholders value? So actuallyhe resigned from several words now, whatever your thoughts are about, thenumber thirteen it was magnus is greate fortune to talk to best selling writer,Osca nominated producer, creative, veteran and businessman, Michael Hethas a guest, and you had to fasten you seat belts for this one, because we gotinto arts, creativity, innovation, conflicts and what really drives changeand lovel ideas to success. Here's what he had to say! No, I like to come back to that failurething, because I think it's something itis underomested Madeit, you know. Ifyou haven't failed enough, you haven't tried enough either so some way,learning from failure and never giving up getting on your feet again and takethat experience, because we always talk...

...about you know we talk about thecreative process like it's something easy, it's a hard one and learning tolearn from failure is one of the key elements. So if you start something andyou failin you and you don't go back there, you have learned nothing. So thekey thing is to get up and do it again and change and be radical in changing,but also find he vision and then change. It then move around, but don't give up.In episode, Fourteen Magnus was joined by Yen Salteene as a guest and again itwas one way you had to be prepared for an entreprenaurial superboost, coveringeverything from serondipoty learnings mistakes right the way through to bolddecisions. It's so important to be kind in all situations. You don't have to bea hard leader which I thought I had to be in the beginning, especially your. Ithink it's easy when you're, young and and try to be, you know, establishe a presence and Ashaagefonders you maybe you're, not as kind as youshould be, and I definitely was that way and I had to be sort of. I have tounderstand that that didn't work. Well, it worked for some people, but for lot,popl, they'll be kind and, on the same note, the situational right. TRY TO BEBE have alot of empathy and understand the specific person rother than just gowitd. This is my leadership style. You know like it or it the highway sort ofthing, and it really comes down to to fourvalues that I push both in in life and in a the company right and it's beingalmost hungry, humble and happy for Hes, and it's so simple for me, because ifyou're, if you're honest, you know U, you will win so much ground in everysingle way of personally and professionally, and I think everyoneand actually give this book to everyone starts. That Stephen Is, is the booklying from Sam Harris? Have you read it Yep yea, absolutely amazing Botshortbook, so everyone should be that tikes no time at all and- and you know, there's no reason to everever ever say anything else, but the truth. Now you already know whathappened in episode: Fifteen Docor City, an expert in Islamic leadership withwisdom across multiple sectors, who also gave that message of unity,togetherness and awareness of how our actions affects the population of theensire planet. A wonderful interview that you can look back on by going toinnovation, re, hundrd and sixtycom forward play bold now episode. Sixteen Nicholas Carlsonchatted with Maglis he's leading founder's Alliance in Sweden, thelargest association of Founders in Europe. He knows everything aboutenchepreneurs and shared this bit of advice. You have to find he who you areand what makes you happy and you have to be opteminded that your life is notjust an exhcale spread sheet. I've been in that too. It's very easy. We way tolive to your schoo straight line, and you know the sort everything else andprobably you desort your own emotion. So you need to align with your passionand your happiness and when you have that purpose andthat's a lifelong process, it's not just with the starking. So if you arelying with with a purpose of your passion, then you create services ofproducts around that and realize that this is a process of daring,interaction and endless work, and that creates a magnut. So otherpeople might become m interested and attracted and that's your basis forfounding something. So it's Super Fun. It's a very, very much a personaldevelopment process for life I would say, and that little journey of clips ofinterviews brings us round to episode seventeen, which means you're prettymuch up to date, and that was when Professor Ginger grund joined Magnusfor a fantastic interview covering...

...subjects like why you should compile aresume of your failures. It's a great way of revisiting, essentially goodideas that may not have had the timing when you first came up with them, butshe also captured a great story about an innovative idea that she justhappened across on her travels. So wine of that, like Stumb, when you think interms of some of the things like Lego series play, is one of my favorites,where you throw a bunch of those Lego toys on the ground and if you've got agroup of Engineers Theyre on their hands and knees fooling aroundinstantly. That mentality is what you need to promote, and it's, I think wewere too worried about you know. What might you think of me if I become silly and it's like, butsilly is maybe where an incredible idea might come. Tom Right, so we would. Wewould push that when we're talking to them to go beyond you know the theroutine two or three ideas make some crazy, mones I'll. Never Forget. I wasat a conference in Barcelona. This is maybe a few years back now where I sawthis person with the suitcase that had four wheels and I had spent years alongwith many other people, almost killing people on a plane, driving yoursuitcase back and forth and wiping up people's arms and legs and elmos- andhere was this soutcase with four wheels that I immediately asked where they got.It went Bot one through I Aldsoi pase away love this thing you could push itwith your finger. He's like. Oh, my God. This is amazing, and when I came backto Canada, I was almost attacked in the airport. People were following me allover the place. Where did you get the suitcase and it's like somebodyprobably said why? Don't we put two our wheels on a suitpace, and I bet one oftheir friends said: that's a really stupid idea. You know what I mean and I'm gonna doit anyway, and Lo and behold they probably now live in SG and are totallyretired and it's a simple ideaa but hy. Why wasn't it sougdom before,because the entire population to lived on planes where dragging theirsuitcases up and down the Il not anymore? Well that just about brings usup todat on some of the interviews that Maglis has had so far on the playbowdpodcast. So on behalf of macklis and of course from me, I sincerely hope thatwhatever two twsad and twenty one brings your way, you find yourself ableto play bold and have a wonderful year ahead and if you're wondering when thenext session of the playbowl podcast is going to be available, I have it onvery good authority that, in other words, Maglus told me that he's Jew tohave more available for you from around January, the twenty second and by thenyou'll have no doubt placed an advanced order for a copy of his book play bold,which you can do by visiting innovation. Torhudred AD sixtycom forward sash playbold, which I know he would definitely want me to remind you about that's duefor releasing February tw theantand twenty one and available wherever younormally purchase. Your essential reads and trust me: Playbolt is not only anessential listeners. A podcast you'll be very glad that you read the book toHappy Holidays, all the best for a fruitful tw Thsandand, twenty one frommagnes myself and all the guests, and thank you for listening. You havelistened to Magnis penker and the playbold podcast go to innovation, wit,thred and sixtycom forward, playbowd for more episodes and additionalmaterial.

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